Loyola University Chicago

Loyola University Chicago

Anonymous Report Form for Sexual Assault and Misconduct

Loyola University Chicago believes in a zero tolerance policy for sexual misconduct.

Members of the Loyola University Chicago community, guests and visitors have the right to be free from sexual violence.

When an allegation of sexual misconduct is brought to the administration, and a respondent is found to have violated this policy, serious sanctions will be used to ensure that such actions are never repeated.

All members of the community are expected to conduct themselves in a manner that does not infringe upon the rights of others.

The Loyola University Chicago Sexual Misconduct Policy has been developed to reaffirm these principles and to provide recourse for those individuals whose rights have been violated. This policy has dual purposes. It serves as a measure for us to determine, after the fact, if behaviors trespass on community values. It also should serve as a guide for you on the expectations we have, preventatively, for sexual communication, sexual responsibility and sexual respect. Please see the Office of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution or the Student Handbook for this policy.


SEXUAL MISCONDUCT OFFENSES INCLUDE, BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO:
1. Non-Consensual Sexual Intercourse (or attempts to commit same)
2. Non-Consensual Sexual Contact (or attempts to commit same)

1. NON-CONSENSUAL SEXUAL INTERCOURSE:
Non-Consensual Sexual Intercourse (commonly known as rape or sexual assault) is
• any sexual intercourse (anal, oral, or vaginal),
• however slight,
• with any body part,
• or object,
• by a person of any sex upon a person of any sex,
• without consent*.

2. NON-CONSENSUAL SEXUAL CONTACT:
Non-Consensual Sexual Contact (which may also be known as sexual assault) is
• any intentional sexual touching,
• however slight,
• with any body part,
• or object,
• by a person of any sex upon a person of any sex,
• without consent*.

*CONSENT DEFINED
Consent is a clear YES to the sexual act in question. Consent is informed, knowing and voluntary. Consent is active, not passive. Silence, in and of itself, cannot be interpreted as consent. Consent can be given by words or actions, as long as those words or actions create mutually understandable permission regarding the conditions of sexual activity.

Consent to one form of sexual activity cannot imply consent to other forms of sexual activity.

Previous relationships or consent cannot imply consent to future sexual acts.

Consent cannot be procured by use of physical force, compelling threats, intimidating behavior, or coercion.

Coercion is unreasonable pressure for sexual activity. Coercive behavior differs from seductive behavior based on the type of pressure someone uses to get consent from another. When someone makes clear to you that they do not want sex, that they want to stop, or that they do not want to go past a certain point of sexual interaction, continued pressure beyond that point can be coercive.

In order to give effective consent, one must be of legal age.

If you have sexual activity with someone you know to be-- or should know to be-mentally or physically incapacitated (by alcohol or other drug use, unconsciousness or blackout), you are in violation of this policy.

Incapacitation is a state where one cannot make a rational, reasonable decision because they lack the ability to understand the who, what, when, where, why or how of their sexual interaction.

This policy also covers someone whose incapacity results from mental disability,sleep,involuntary physical restraint, or from the taking of a so-called "date-rape" drug.

Possession, use and/or distribution of any of these substances, including Rohypnol, Ketomine, GHB, Burundanga, etc. is prohibited, and administering one of these drugs to another student for the purpose of inducing incapacity is a violation of this policy.

Use of alcohol or other drugs will never function to excuse behavior that violates this policy.

Sexual activity includes:
Intentional contact with the breasts, buttock, groin, or genitals, or touching another with any of these body parts, or making another touch you or themselves with or on any of these body parts; any intentional bodily contact in a sexual manner, though not involving contact with/of/by breasts, buttocks, groin, genitals, mouth or other orifice.

Intercourse however slight, meaning vaginal penetration by a penis, object, tongue or finger; anal penetration by a penis, object, tongue, or finger; and oral copulation (mouth to genital contact or genital to mouth contact).

Differences between Anonymous Reporting and Filing a Complaint with Campus Safety or
the Office of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution (OSCCR)

You have options when choosing to report a sexual assault at Loyola. You can file an anonymous report through this online form OR you can report to Campus Safety and/or the Office of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution. The action Loyola can and will take is dependent on the reporting option you choose.
Here are some details of those actions:

If you chose to file an anonymous report:
      • No investigation will take place
      • The offender will not be held accountable for their actions
      • You can disclose as little or as much information as you wish about the incident
      • You can request survivor services and accommodations found at the end of this form or at
        www.luc.edu/sexualassault
      • Information in the report may be used by university officials when considering what general
          prevention and survivor response services are needed on campus
             *Any identifying information that may be included in your original report will be removed before the               information is shared as noted here

If you chose to file a complaint with Campus Safety or OSCCR
      • An investigation will take place
      • The offender may be held accountable for their actions
      • You will share information about the incident with a Campus Safety officer and/or OSCCR
        representative
      • You can request survivor services and accommodations found at the end of this form or at
          www.luc.edu/sexualassault
      • If the crime falls under the parameters set by the Jeanne Clery Act
         (http://www.luc.edu/safety/clery.html), the incident will be counted toward Loyola's yearly crime
         statistics as mandated by the Act
            *Your report will indicate your agreement to have the information contained in your report
              included in crime statistics
      • Information in the report may be used by university officials when considering what general
         prevention and survivor response services are needed on campus
            *Any identifying information that may be included in your original report will be removed
              before the information is shared as noted here